Day by Day

The following audio clips were collected from homeless individuals in downtown San Luis Obispo who were approached with different questions regarding their experience on the streets. As an overlooked part of our community, the homeless population holds a wealth of wisdom regarding the obstacles that anyone else would face in their daily lives.

What is the biggest problem in your life right now?

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David Danielson, a 56-year-old man from Cayucos, has lived most of his life in San Luis Obispo. A couple years ago he lost complete movement on the left side of his body due to a stroke, rendering him incapable of holding a job. After relearning how to walk and talk, Danielson now spends his days on the streets listening to the radio and visiting the park.

“I am going be honest about this. I mean, if I could quit drinking, if I could quit drinking, I could probably live indoors again. But I do not want to be sober and disabled and homeless. It does not sound like a good idea to me. So I drink, because I just want to feel numb. I do not want to feel anything. I sleep on concrete, no blankets, no nothing, just curl in a ball and do the best of it, and do the best that I can. It is not comfortable. I mean, its pretty miserable. Get up, grab a bottle, do it all over again and get numb, and then you feel better.”

What is your message to the world?

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Valerie Derby, a 52-year-old mother from New York, came to San Luis Obispo for the great weather. She lives on the streets with her husband, struggling to scrape together a couple dollars every day to just stay alive. More than anything in the world, the only thing Derby wants is to be truly happy.

“Look to God, because he helps you get through it.”

Have you ever been in love?

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Jesse James Morrison, a 42-year-old native of Los Osos used to have a house under Section 8, a low-income housing aid program. Since then, he has had a hard time getting off the street because of the assumptions society makes toward homelessness, such as being constantly drunk. Morrison’s biggest problem right now is his feet, which are severely swollen due to the prolonged periods of walking in shoes that do not fit.

“The last girl that I was with, Michelle, I completely fell in love with her, but, just the way she put things, I caught, in my opinion, I got her on the rebound and she was too, she was still having feelings for the man that she was widowed by. He was a lawyer in Atascadero State Hospital. He put child molesters and stuff like that away and kept them in there. But, I thought that was one of the things that would keep us together, but due to inflictions that each one of us had and situations with our families, which I divorced my family because they were bigots. She just lives too far away and her infliction caused her to do things that she normally would not do and took her away from me for the rest of my life.”

What was the happiest day of your life?

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Ben Burns, a 28-year-old man from Atascadero, spends his time with other homeless individuals in San Luis Obispo. It was interesting to see the connections he has within the homeless population, especially when I mentioned names and discovered that Burns regularly spends time with Squidward, Greg and Scotland. Although he feels that homelessness is a lonely experience, Burns always remembers the importance of being patient and kind to others.

“The happiest day of my life, the day I looked around and I was actually happy with my surroundings enough to be homeless and not just want to, you know, and get all really dark and think I need to call the mental hospital or something. That’s when I was happy.”

What is Mine is Yours

Story Highlights:

  • When homelessness meets terminal illness
  • Interview with Kennedy Library’s night supervisor

It is easy to judge a homeless person based on appearances and write off their actions as another casualty of mental illness, something that has become prevalent to me while observing the interactions between the residents and homeless population of San Luis Obispo.

This was my first impression of Scotland, a 27-year-old man who approached me eagerly with the usual gimmick to make a couple bucks. However, after asking him for an interview, he dropped the facade.

Scotland has multiple tattoos all over his body, ranging from professionally done pieces to tattoos done by friends. His rule for tattoos is "if I give you a tattoo, you have to give me one."

Scotland has multiple tattoos all over his body, ranging from professionally done pieces to tattoos done by friends. His rule for tattoos is “if I give you a tattoo, you have to give me one.”

Overseas Experience
After moving from Scotland to San Luis Obispo over 16 years ago with his family, Scotland spent a vast majority of his adult life on the streets. “Even though I can stay with my Mom in Cambria, I choose to be homeless because I like traveling,” said Scotland.

In addition to spending time overseas, he has also been to:

  • California
  • Oregon
  • Washington
  • Florida

Scotland commented on his frequent traveling and said “I want to see what I can see before it is gone. There are still 46 more states to see and I want to see all of that too.”

Scotland came back to San Luis Obispo three months ago after visiting the ocean and the whales in Seattle with his best friend Rocky. "I always end up back here because my best friends are here," said Scotland. Patrick (right), is one of his friends that he spends time with everyday.

Scotland came back to San Luis Obispo three months ago after visiting the ocean and the whales in Seattle with his best friend Rocky. “I always end up back here because my best friends are here,” said Scotland. Patrick (right), is one of his friends that he spends time with everyday.

At the age of 22, he went back to Scotland to find his Dad. “The happiest day of my life was when I came back to San Luis Obispo after I tried to fight my real Dad. I wanted closure because he used to beat me. Instead of fighting me, he opened the door and came out with my sleeping bag instead of his fists,” said Scotland. He has not seen him since.

Living with a Terminal Illness
Generally, Scotland felt happy and content with his life despite his poor health.

“I was diagnosed with pancreatic cancer a year and a half ago,” said Scotland.

He was told he only had five months to live. Because he cannot afford any treatment for his illness, his only option is to wait.

Scotland was born and raised a Roman Catholic, and was beaten by his Dad growing up. He was taught to not associate with Protestants, and considers his heritage a large part of his identity. "My Dad is Sicilian, and my Mom is Scottish," said Scotland.

Scotland was born and raised a Roman Catholic, and was beaten by his Dad growing up. He was taught to not associate with Protestants, and considers his heritage a large part of his identity, “My Dad is Sicilian, and my Mom is Scottish.”

This experience has affected his day-to-day actions, sometimes even conflicting with his survival on the streets. “My biggest problem is that I hand all my stuff away. I give away anything that I have to other homeless people because that is how I live. I have always been that way,” said Scotland. Last week, he gave away two of his jackets to new street kids passing through downtown.

During the day, he is free to move around, unbound by the massive backpack and bedroll that burden other homeless individuals. It is only when the sun goes down that Scotland encounters problems with his generosity. He spends his nights sharing warmth with his friends, because he physically has nothing except the clothes on his back.

Scotland routinely spends the night sleeping next to his friend Squidward and his dog, Lucky. The pair have known each other for eight years, oftentimes being confused as brothers because of their matching scruffy beards.

Now, Scotland lives each and every day as pure as possible.

“My theory on life right now is that Mother Nature is my higher power,” said Scotland, “I can hang out with her under this tree and feel calm.”

Different Spheres of Interaction
Scotland and Stephanie Lafferty, the night supervisor at Cal Poly Kennedy Library, have never met. Nevertheless, Lafferty still has some experience into the life and times of homeless individuals in San Luis Obispo. She has worked at the library for over six years and interacted with numerous homeless people who visit the library. “We usually do leave them alone as long as they are not threatening students. I have no problem with them,” said Lafferty.

For the most part, the homeless individuals that visit the library just want to be left alone and sheltered from the weather. They want a safe place where they have access to:

  • computers
  • bathrooms
  • books
  • a quiet place to rest

Despite isolated interactions with the homeless individuals that do pass through the library, Lafferty does not treat them any differently than any other visitor at the library. “It is a matter of trying to treat them with enough respect as you can,” said Lafferty.

Don’t talk about it, be about it

Story Highlights:

  • Perspective from a transient group of homeless people
  • Input from store owners in the community

There are two sides to every story, and the homelessness situation in San Luis Obispo is no exception. After growing up in the suburbs surrounded by negative feelings toward the homeless population, I spent the past couple of weeks hearing the stories and perspectives from some of these transient individuals.

Just Passing Through
Patrick, Tori and Ernesto spent a warm Tuesday morning on Higuera Street, trying to gather enough funds to hitch out of town. While they waited, each of them told me about their experiences.

Patrick (Left), Tori (Middle), Ernesto (Right) and Rico the dog all met while on a train ride in Tucson. In addition to two other members of their group, Steve-o and Emily (not pictured), they travel and share everything together.

Patrick (Left), Tori (Middle), Ernesto (Right) and Rico the dog all met while on a train ride in Tucson. In addition to two other members of their group, Steve-o and Emily (not pictured), they travel and share everything together.

Patrick is a 24 year old from Miami, Florida. Because he spends 75% of his time traveling alone, he has been to over forty-five states and even some neighboring countries. He earned his associate’s degree in Orlando at a community college, and tried to pursue a degree in film before dropping out. In regards to homelessness in San Luis Obispo, Patrick said the amount of aggression between the homeless and the police is about average compared to other cities.

“It depends on the amount of interaction. The police treat us badly, but they are people also. Cops are educated and smart, so it is all a matter of interaction. I am a citizen at the end of the day and I try to act accordingly.”

Originally from Tucson, Arizona, Tori is the youngest of the group. She has been in and out of jail five times since she was 15, and blames the bad reputation that homelessness gets.“There are too many people in this lifestyle. It ruins it for the rest of us who are struggling to make ends meet. Now, homeless people are actually targeted by police officers,” said Tori.

She recalls a time when she was approached by a police officer. “I was told I was intoxicated, even when I was completely sober,” said Tori. When she tried to talk with the police officer, he simply flipped all one hundred pounds of her onto her front and arrested her for resistance. She was refused a Breathalyzer and was not read her Miranda Rights before being unfairly arrested. When she reached the police station, another officer took one look at her and asked, “You’re drunk?”

Ernesto, a 26-year-old from Tennessee, went to college at Cleveland State University. He estimates he has been in and out of jail over 30 times, not including the times he has been arrested and then released immediately afterwards. Ernesto said that the trick to being let go is to make sure he is not alone when arrested. “If you have at least one witness, there is more credibility,” said Ernesto.

Ernesto and Tori have known each other for almost three months. After meeting on the road, they have stuck together ever since.

Ernesto and Tori have known each other for almost three months. After meeting on the road, they have stuck together ever since.

Like Anybody Else
During my time with them, hardly any one stopped to give them money. “We are just people. Most of society does not pay attention to us, but the ones that do are really nice to us,” said Tori. I quickly learned that they stay together no matter what, even if that means it is more difficult to get help.

“It’s different between a group. When we are by ourselves, we tend to get more money. Right now we need supplies,” said Patrick.

Ernesto, Patrick, Tori, Emily and Steve-o have traveled cross-country together and are currently headed to Oakland where they hope to settle down with some friends.

Community Interactions
On the other side of the spectrum, many downtown business owners are unhappy with the rise of homelessness in the area. “My main concern with homelessness in San Luis Obispo is how so few are actually from here. Many migrate here because of the infrastructure,” said Jack McKeen, a downtown store employee, “and every so often there are spurts of new people that show up. Some of them are genuinely good people, but it is more important to take care of our own first.”

The major day-to-day problems that many employees face with the homeless in downtown include stealing and aggressive panhandling. “They get in customer’s faces, and it hurts business,” said Carlos Macias, another downtown store employee.

McKeen and Macias used to spend their lunch hours outside near the creek in downtown, before the interactions with the homeless made them more cautious. “I’ve been offered drugs and even overheard conversations about drug exchanges,” said Macias.

According to Macias, many homeless individuals that he has interacted with show signs of Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) or other mental disabilities.

“Most of them are benign, but there are cases of genuine concern that ruin it for other homeless individuals,” said Macias.

Cause for Alarm
McKeen and Macias recalled a time when they found a homeless man passed out in the bushes near their building. “We were not sure if he was alive or not,” said McKeen.

In other occasions, Macias has gone out of his way to give a couple clothing items to a homeless man. “If I can help him out, I will, but I do not feel bad when they choose this lifestyle,” said Macias.

According to McKeen, homelessness has become a major social issue for the area. In addition to the city council meetings attended by both business owners and homeless individuals themselves, there is also a new specialized group of police officers that deal with the homeless specifically. “When I was a kid, there were no homeless people in San Luis Obispo,” said McKeen. Today, police are inclined to be prejudice through the insistence of business owners and influx of homeless people.

Now more than ever, the interactions between the homeless, the community and the San Luis Obispo Police Department are struggling to stay balanced.

They told me I could not live

Story Highlights

  • Interview with Steve Majors
  • Input from a long time San Luis Obispo resident
  • Perspective from a downtown employee and student

With the arrival of the first rain of the year, I was skeptical to meet anyone because of the nasty weather. However, just as I was about to scout out Mitchell Park, I walked by a parking structure and met Steve Majors.

Early Exposure
The first things I noticed about Majors were his kind eyes and genuine voice. Originally from El Paso, Texas, the 52-year-old man struggled with discrimination his entire life. Majors was born in a Hispanic neighborhood, where he remembered being called a “Conejo Loco” and taunted because of his skin color. For many years, Majors was one of the only non-Hispanic kids in his class, regularly dealing with the struggles of racism.

“No matter who you are, I will treat you with honor and respect, because that was how I was raised.” – Majors.

Unfair Discrimination
Eventually, Majors got a job at Denny’s. He worked there for several years, where he was able to build his reputation as the best cook in the area stretching from King City to Santa Maria. Unfortunately, Majors suffered a severe foot infection from poor circulation to his legs. He lost half of his right leg and half of his left foot due to the diabetes related injury, rendering him unable to work. Denny’s ended up firing him.

Steve Majors has spent the past five years panhandling downtown to make ends meet for his family. Despite his disability, carpal tunnel, slipped discs and diabetes, Majors says he does not mind being on the streets.

Steve Majors has spent the past five years panhandling downtown to make ends meet for his family. Despite his disability, carpal tunnel, slipped discs and diabetes, Majors says he does not mind being on the streets.

Many people pass by and pretend he does not exist, while others have called the cops because they felt harassed. He has even been accused of thievery due to his panhandling.

During the interview, Steve acquired two dollars in quarters and a gift card to Food 4 Less. He tucked it into his shirt pocket and said: “There you go, there’s dinner tonight.”

During the interview, Steve acquired two dollars in quarters and a gift card to Food 4 Less. He tucked it into his shirt pocket and said: “There you go, there’s dinner tonight.”

Majors shared his frustration, grasping my hand and asking me if I had ever been discriminated against for something that I could not control. Of course, I knew exactly what he was talking about. I realized that Steve wore his homelessness like race or gender. His homelessness was only skin deep, and did not define him as a person because beyond the old clothing and calloused hands, there lay a person with hopes and dreams of something beyond the streets.

“One time while I was on the street, someone told me to kill myself. I thought we were all God’s children. If we are all born the same way, why treat someone differently because of the little things?” – Majors.

A Local’s Perspective
Leon Keonan shared similar sentiments when I asked him about homelessness in San Luis Obispo. Keonan has worked at the Historical Center for the past twelve years and been a resident of the area since 1971. “I absolutely do not think they pick their lifestyle. I can not judge anyone for their actions because each case is different,” said Keonan.

At age 80, Leon Keonen still works part time at the San Luis Obispo Historical Center. He used to be a teacher at the local high school for many years before retiring. He says that homeless people regularly seek shelter in the museum.

At age 80, Leon Keonen still works part time at the San Luis Obispo Historical Center. He used to be a teacher at the local high school for many years before retiring. He says that homeless people regularly come into the museum.

According to Keonen, the number of homeless has increased in the past years, making it a prominent public issue.

Movements began within the community, such as programs targeted to helping the homeless. Two homeless shelters were built in response to community efforts, the Prado Day Center and the Maxine Lewis Shelter.

Keonen said the prominence of homeless here is due to the mild weather, similar to other cities up and down the coast of California. Throughout his years in San Luis Obispo, he noticed a counter culture among the homeless that was sometimes oriented through drugs and other substances. They used to live in groups around Mission Plaza, spending their nights near the creek bed before being forced to follow discriminatory laws.

These include:

  • No sleeping in parks
  • No smoking in certain areas
  • Discouragement of loitering on the streets
  • Expensive tickets they cannot afford

Despite stereotypes, homeless individuals are more often than not dealing with untreated mental illness rather than substance abuse.

Worlds apart
According to the Cheyenne Liu, a biochemistry student at Cal Poly and barista at Barnes and Noble, the three separate bubbles in San Luis Obispo include the long-term residents, people on campus, and the homeless. “For me, the only way to traverse those areas is through working here,” said Liu.

Cheyenne Liu recognizes homeless people at Barnes and Noble when she works at night. After working there as a barista, Liu said she had “a heightened awareness of homelessness.”

Cheyenne Liu recognizes homeless people during her shift at Barnes and Noble. After working there as a barista, Liu said she had “a heightened awareness of homelessness.”